Minimum Limits

March 31, 2013

Weatherford attorneys and those in Mineral Wells, Aledo, Springtown, Hudson Oaks, and other parts of Parker County need to know the minimum limits required on cars in Texas. But also knowing those limits is important when dealing with an out of state driver.
Fox Business recently ran an article that discusses these limits.
The article tells us that most states have laws outlining the minimum amount of liability coverage you must purchase.
However, those minimum amounts may not be enough, especially if you're in an accident. The cost of a car accident can be much more than the limits required by most states. The Insurance Information Institute recommends that you carry at least $100,000 of bodily injury protection per person and $300,000 per accident (known as 100/300).
Auto insurance minimums
State Minimums
Alabama 25/50/25
Alaska 50/100/25
Arizona 15/30/10
Arkansas 25/50/25
California 15/30/5
Colorado 25/50/15
Connecticut 20/40/10
Delaware 15/30/10
District of Columbia 25/50/5
Florida 10/20/10
Georgia 25/50/25
Hawaii 20/40/10
Idaho 25/50/15
Illinois 20/40/15
Indiana 25/50/10
Iowa 20/40/15
Kansas 25/50/10
Kentucky 25/50/10
Louisiana 15/30/25
Maine 50/100/25
Maryland 30/60/15
Massachusetts 20/40/5
Michigan 20/40/10
Minnesota 30/60/10
Mississippi 25/50/25
Missouri 25/50/10
Montana 25/50/10
Nebraska 25/50/25
Nevada 15/30/10
New Hampshire 25/50/25
New Jersey 15/30/5
New Mexico 25/50/10
New York 25/50/10
North Carolina 30/60/25
North Dakota 25/50/25
Ohio 12.5/25/7.5
Oklahoma 25/50/25
Oregon 25/50/20
Pennsylvania 15/30/5
Rhode Island 25/50/25
South Carolina 25/50/25
South Dakota 25/50/25
Tennessee 25/50/15
Texas 30/60/25
Utah 25/65/15
Vermont 25/50/10
Virginia 25/50/20
Washington 25/50/10
West Virginia 20/40/10
Wisconsin 25/50/10
Wyoming 25/50/20
Perhaps you've wondered about the three numbers that are part of the auto liability insurance that you bought.
1. The first number is the bodily injury liability maximum coverage for one individual who's injured in an auto accident.
2. The second number is the maximum amount of bodily injury liability coverage per accident.
3. The third number represents the maximum amount of property damage liability, and it's per vehicle.
For example, if you live in North Carolina, the numbers are 30/60/25, which means the minimum liability limits are $30,000 for injuries to one person, $60,000 for all injuries and $25,000 for property damage in one accident. In Wyoming, the figures are 25/50/20, which means that the minimum liability limits are $25,000 for injuries to one person, $50,000 for all injuries and $20,000 for property damage per vehicle in an accident. And if you reside in Michigan, the numbers are 20/40/10, meaning that the minimum liability limits are $20,000 for injuries to one person, $40,000 for all injuries and $10,000 for property damage per vehicle in an accident.
The typical minimum amount of auto liability insurance coverage is 20/40/15, says Robert Passmore, senior director, personal lines policy, Property Casualty Insurers Association of America (PCIAA). States have held these numbers pretty stable over the years, says Passmore. "Most people carry more than the minimums," he notes.
The law regulating minimum insurance in Texas is found in the Texas Financial Responsibility Act and specifically in Texas Transportation Code, Section 601.072.